Sunday, May 12, 2013

Give your best, freely investing out of your heart.

I'm repeatedly running into the same obstacle, no matter what I do in life.

I hate charging for things I would do for free. This is why we play "name your own price, so long as it covers my costs" when I sell you art ... and, it turns out, this is preventing me from selling anything on my new site, too. So far, anyway.

Now, I have a few minor solutions to the problem. It turns out that if it is "a product" like the prints I'll eventually make available here once my printer gives me his price list ... or, say, a mug at CafePress with my art on it, I have no problem charging the recommended prices. They are no longer the art I poured out ... they are objects with my art imprinted upon them. See the difference?

How this has translated to my new site is that I'm making the content and eventually the ebooks, easily downloadable and free to share, so as to encourage anybody who needs it. After all, it's more important to help someone than to sell something.

On the other hand, I need to sell stuff so I can pay for things like rent and food and stop depending on family to support me. So, I'll be creating tangible booklets containing the information from my site ... after adding and rewriting and generally turning-it-into-an-actual-book-instead-of-a-collection-of-blog-posts. Then ... I'll be making them available through a POD publisher at their suggested price.

It's all very odd, when I look from outside and consider the usual expectations and how people seem to think, on average. Inside, it's the only way to be and I don't know how to see differently.

So I'll continue choosing not to do anything unless it's something I'd do for free.

If you have to pay me to motivate me to do it ... then you're paying to receive lower quality work from me. Well, you would if I agreed to accept your attempt at motivation, that is. I'll just do the work for free, because I want to ... and then if you find it valuable, you can pay me.

I'm left trying to figure out this whole "make a living from your work" thing.

Do I attempt to add value to the world? Yes.

To individuals? Yes.

Do I expect to be paid for this?.......  Uh ...

I guess I need to be paid for it to provide for my family.

But the reason for doing anything in the first place is because it means something to someone ... the world is better for having done it, and that is enough of a reason isn't it?

If I contribute a lot of what I am worst at because it is expected or I'll get paid, and never offer my best because nobody thinks to ask or knows that is is of value to them, then of what worth is my gift?

So I focus on sharing what I have been given ... and when people say it is a gift, I am thankful that they see it too, that the beauty of what I offer is really more than I could have forced myself to contribute because someone expects it. It flows through from outside myself while being entirely my own.... If that makes sense....

This whole mentality is just too idealistic, isn't it? Guess I'll have to figure out how to live one way or another ... but I believe this awkward path is the best way forward.

Either I'll learn to think differently somehow ... or there is an alternative route that people usually don't consider.

In the meantime you can all have fun watching me stumble around trying to figure it out.

Oh ... and if you want to do something truly, incredibly amazing ... then share GlassHeartRepair.com with friends, acquaintances, and coworkers who are caught up in despair. Link it to college students who are struggling with life decisions. Post the URL where the broken-hearted share their grief.

And maybe even consider sharing your story of finding growth in the midst of a shattered world with the community.

This isn't just my story.

It's our story ... and how we encourage one another. Invest your story in the lives around you.

The weaving of our paths through life is a growing glimpse of the beauty beyond the veil.

Now I'm off to figure out whether I can offer Creative Hope Mentoring (That's one possible name for the personal mentoring I intend to offer, anyway.) for free and let people pay me if they feel they've grown .... or received value ... afterward. Do you think it'll work?

3 comments:

  1. One alternative is bartering, exchanging one thing of value for another. Artists do that, there's even a program in New York that puts artists in touch with people who are willing to exchange, for example, health or dental care services for a piece of artwork; others might trade food or carpentry skills. There's not too much that couldn't be bartered. It's a tough arrangement, though, and makes living hard.


    Most artists I know have some difficulty placing a monetary value on their work; either they offer it for much too little, undersell themselves out of their studio when a gallery also is representing them, or asking too much. I tend to think most people will offer and pay a fair price for what they want. Your original drawings are excellent. Ask an experienced artist to help you figure out a price and then stick to it. You have to believe your work has value.

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  2. Thank you. Over at Kelly Sauer's blog, she was talking about value, too. One of the comments said, "I put a price on the time taken away from my family." and I thought that was an interesting point, worth keeping in mind.

    Actually, getting advice and having someone knowledgeable (and who I trust, say, "This is a reasonable price for your art," would solve the dilemma for me. Or at least I think it would. That hasn't happened yet.

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  3. Good stuff Karen. I hope things are going well for you.

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